Volunteers provide the dynamic workforce for ongoing native riparian habitat restoration along the Little Salmon River.
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Volunteer Opportunities                                                                                                 

Volunteers provide the workforce to restore native habitat in southwest Idaho, collecting seed and planting since 1990 when the Department initiated its Volunteer Program. Native habitat restoration is the focus of our Southwest Region Volunteer Program and volunteers make this important work possible and successful.

Our Volunteer Native Riparian Habitat Restoration has evolved to semiannual project work: mid-April through mid-June, resuming late September through early November. Plus we provide TLC to plantings during hot, dry summer months, watering and weeding plantings. We plant mostly five gallon native trees and shrubs in the spring and construct willow weavings in the fall.

Volunteers truly make a difference like this dedicated woman planting a red osier dogwood next to Round Valley Creek.
Volunteers truly make a difference like this dedicated woman planting a red osier dogwood next to Round Valley Creek.

Volunteers love planting in the snow! Boulder Creek 5/12.
Volunteers love planting in the snow! Boulder Creek 5/12.

River Menders Volunteer Projects 2015

Project: NATIVE RIPARIAN HABITAT RESTORATION
What: Plant native shrubs and trees in an ongoing effort to restore native riparian habitats.
Where: Little Salmon River & tributaries.
When: April 18 & 25; May 2, 9 & 16; June 6 & 13, 2015.
Logistics: Tools, transportation provided: plan on 12 hour days.
# People: Ten to fifteen each day.

Contact: (208) 327-7095
Volunteer Coordinator Michael Young:

"Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets, but humbler folk may circumvent this restriction if they know how. To plant a pine, for example, one need be neither god nor poet; one need only own a good shovel. By virtue of this curious loophole in the rules, any clodhopper may say: Let there be a tree--and there will be one."
            Aldo Leopold, conservationist (1887-1948)
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